Skip to content

Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the 12 months 2022 Winners Launched—Ponder Circle of Life and Dying

“Tour boats had been watching the younger whale for days because it slowly moved by the bay, showing sicker and slower with extra shark bites over its our bodies day after day.”

The scene was visceral. Whereas making its annual migration north alongside Ningaloo Reef off Australia’s northwest coast, the fledgling-adult humpback, maimed and ailing, inched towards the pure terminus of its life’s journey.

Ashlee Jansen, a budding marine photographer from Western Australia, was there. That day in July 2021, she captured a profound visible allegory of life and loss of life—one that may garner ample renown.

“Associates had noticed an oil slick on the floor attributable to the fallen whale,” Jansen acknowledged in a press launch. “As they acquired nearer, they have been hit by the distinct odor and knew that that they had discovered the placement of the carcass resting on the ocean ground.

“Excited to share their discover, I rushed out to their location and jumped within the water to search out the skeleton of the younger humpback whale [lying] nonetheless on the ocean ground. Surrounding the naked bones have been a number of completely different species of well-fed sharks.”

She added, “We spent a couple of hours floating above the whale carcass, watching the sharks come nearer and nearer, unfazed by our presence as they searched the realm for any remaining meals.”

Her palpably stirring picture, a devoted testomony to the circle of life, received Jansen the excellence of changing into the Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the 12 months 2022.

Nature’s Prey by Ashlee Jansen. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)

Nonetheless a novice within the artwork of underwater pictures, having taken up the pursuit in 2017, Jansen shared how proud she felt to be topped the highest prize.

“This competitors is such a prestigious award and being named total winner is one thing I had by no means even thought-about taking place, particularly so early in my pictures profession,” she mentioned.

“I’ve all the time checked out this competitors and award so extremely, so to be chosen because the winner out of so many proficient photographers, a few of whom I’ve appeared as much as and have impressed me over my profession, is totally unimaginable.”

The judges have been unified in selecting Jansen’s picture among the many 2,443 entries submitted—probably the most the competitors’s ever acquired.

The appreciable aesthetic attraction in Jansen’s compelling portrait entails its “clever round composition,” the judges acknowledged. The curve of the whale’s skeletal ribs mirror the patterns of the sand and waves, holding the viewers’ eyes inside the body transferring between the dwelling and the useless.

Together with the title, Jansen acquired a $10,000 money prize and a journey prize from Coral Expeditions. The competition was a three way partnership between Australian Geographic and Adelaide’s South Australian Museum.

“This 12 months’s successful picture by Ashlee Jansen is a strong assertion concerning the circle of life and the interdependence of species,” acknowledged Australian Geographic Editor-in-Chief Ms. Chrissie Goldrick.

Epoch Times Photo
“Night time Gentle Eating” by Jannico Kelk. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)

To not be outshone too brightly, a bunch of different awe-inspiring nature pictures comprised the remainder of the competitors winners in a number of classes. These classes included Animals in Nature, City Animals, Botanical Panorama, the newly minted Astrophotography class, and others.

Featured is one dramatically-lit seahorse within the pitch deep, in addition to the gaping jaws of an incredible white confronting the digicam lens, an acrobatic cave-dwelling bat eating on fireflies in flight, aerial scenes of lush jungle with mist and white water to take one’s breath away, and way more.

Epoch Times Photo
“The Outlier” by Jason Perry. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)

“Annually I’m amazed by the standard of entries we obtain for this competitors, with entrants capturing unimaginable moments in time that encourage us to deepen our relationship with the pure world, while additionally difficult us to replicate on our affect,” acknowledged Brian Oldman , director of the South Australian Museum.

Added our winner, “This unforgettable expertise is a reminder of how harsh nature and the meals chain could be, but such an vital a part of the pure ecosystem. One animal’s sacrifice can present so many vitamins to so many different species of wildlife for years to return.”

These high alternatives will probably be staged on the South Australian Museum till Sunday, October 30, and on the Australian Museum in Sydney till Sunday, December 11, 2022.

Epoch Times Photo
“Midnight Seahorse” by Matt Testoni. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“The Tunnel of Eerie Blue Gentle” by Zichen Wang. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Sleeping Dragon” by Gary Meredith. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“A pink tomb” by James Dorey. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Gnarled Mossy Cloud Forest” by Justin Gilligan. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Breaking Daybreak” by Yan Zhang. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Forces of Nature” by Ellie Morris. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Ocean Big” by Jake Wilton. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Head On” by Matty Smith. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Fish Rock Cave” by Matt Krumins. Shot in South West Rocks, NSW, Australia. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Crackle and Pop” by Jarrod Koh. Single body capturing a downpour and lightning strike. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Snagged” by Alan Kwok. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
Flinders Rise by William Godward. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
By Alejandro Trevino. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
By Alejandro Trevino. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
By Alejandro Trevino. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
By Alejandro Trevino. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
By Alejandro Trevino. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
By Alejandro Trevino. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
Impermanence by Cian O’Hagan. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)
Epoch Times Photo
“Abstraction of an Icon” by Cian O’Hagan. (Courtesy of South Australian Museum)

Share your tales with us at emg.impressed@epochtimes.com, and proceed to get your day by day dose of inspiration by signing up for the Impressed e-newsletter at TheEpochTimes.com/e-newsletter

.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.